Muscle conditioning

The effects on muscle atrophy due to inactivity using low-current stimulation are some of the most well-known and proven results of EMS therapy.

13/01/2017

Post-operative muscle building

The effects on muscle atrophy due to inactivity using low-current stimulation are some of the most well-known and proven results of EMS therapy.
13/01/2017

Improved performance in sports

Scientific effects of EMS training By Dr. Kleinöder, Sports University Cologne (2010) Stamina Static endurance: the average increase is 30.3% at an average stimulation frequency of 75 +/- 44 Hz. (1, 2, 3) Dynamic endurance: the average increase is 41% at an average stimulation frequency of 76 Hz +/- 10 Hz (2, 4, 5, 7). Long-term stimulation with low frequency stimulation of skeletal muscle in experiments on animals (rabbits) resulted in the development of mainly slow twitch muscle fibres with a high proportion of mitochondria (6). Selected Literature: Alon, G., McCombre, S.A., Koutsantonis, S., Stumphauzer, L.J., Burgwin, K.C., Parent, M.M., & Bosworth, R.A. (1987). Comparison of the Effects of Electrical Stimulation and Exercise on Abdominal Musculature. Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 8(12), 567-573. Ballantyne, E., Donne, B. (1999): Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on static and dynamic abdominal strength and endurance in healthy males. Sport Science, 431. Kahanovitz, […]
13/01/2017

Increasing synchronising and recruiting

Scientific effects of EMS training By Dr. Kleinöder, Sports University Cologne (2010) Sprint and jump The sprint studies showed improvements in competitive athletes of 3.1±1.7% over a 3-week period. Brocherie et al. (2) improvement of 4.8% in the sprint time of ice hockey players over 10m. Pichon et al. (9) improvement of 1.3% to cover 25m (sport type: swimming) and 1.45% for the 50m freestyle time. With combined strength training (plyometrics/EMS), Herrero et al. recorded (3) a 2.3% reduction in time needed to sprint 20m among untrained individuals. After EMS training, jumping abilities improved by between 2.3% and 19.2%; after isometric EMS training (an average of +10±6.5%); and 6.7% to 21.4% after dynamic EMS training (1, 4, 5, 7, 8, 13). After combined EMS training, the literature states that there was an average increase in jumping ability of 11.2±5.5% (3, 6, 11). Selected Literature: Babault, N., Cometti, G., Bernardin, M., […]
13/01/2017

Increasing endurance

Electromyostimulation – a systematic review of the effects of different EMS methods on selected strength parameters in trained and elite athletes Dr. Kleinöder, Sports University Cologne (2009) ABSTRACT This is the first part of two studies that systematically review the current state of research and structure the results of selected Electromyostimulation (EMS) studies in a way that makes accurate comparisons possible. This part will focus on the effects of EMS on strength enhancement. On the basis of these results part two will deal with the influence of the training regimen and stimulation parameters on EMS-Training effectiveness in order to make recommendations for training control. Out of about 200 studies, 89 trials were selected according to pre-defined criteria: subject age (<35), subject health (unimpaired), EMS type (percutaneus stimulation), and study duration (>7days). To evaluate these trials, we first defined appropriate categories according to the type of EMS (local or whole-body) and […]
13/01/2017

Increasing elasticity and maximum strength

Scientific effects of EMS training By Dr. Kleinöder, Sports University Cologne (2010) Elasticity and performance Various authors have confirmed a positive effect on contraction speed (1, 3, 5). The EMS training group saw the greatest gain in movement speed (approx. 30% improvement in muscles involved in bending bones), thus significantly increasing performance (4, 6). A combination of classic strength training (hypertrophy) and EMS training increases both performance elements (movement speed and power), (4,6). Selected Literature: Andersen, L.L., & Aagaard, P. (2006). Influence of maximal muscle strength and intrinsic muscle contractile properties on contractile rate of force development. Eur J Appl Physiol, 96, 46-52. Babault, N., Cometti, G., Bernardin, M., Pousson, M. &Chatard, J.-C. (2007). Effects of Electromyostimulation Training on Muscle Strength and Power of Elite Rugby Players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 21(2), 431-437. Colson, S., Martin, A., & Van Hoecke, J. (2000). Reexamination of training effects by electrostimulation […]
13/01/2017

Targeted muscle building (hypertrophy)

Scientific effects of EMS training By Dr. Kleinöder, Sports University Cologne (2010) Maximum strength and muscle hypertrophy Trained athletes from various disciplines experienced increases in maximum isometric strength of between 15% and 40%, with an average of 32.6% (5, 6, 7, 9, 22, 24, 27). The average improvement in maximum isometric strength following EMS training with untrained subjects was 23.5% (1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 25, 28). Athletes can achieve 30 – 40% improvements in maximum strength after only 5 weeks using EMS (12). Using MVC, competitive swimmers achieved improvements in the eccentric and concentric contractions of their latissimus dorsi and quadriceps femoris muscles and better freestyle swimming times (23). Case study of a high-performance weightlifter: 4 months of EMS training: 1 RM (repetition maximum) increased during squats by around 20kg, further improvements to ‘clean’ and ‘jerk and snatch’. EMS can […]
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